Has Your Work Situation Changed? You Can Roll Your 401(k) Funds into a Self-Directed IRA

Has Your Work Situation Changed? You Can Roll Your 401(k) Funds into a Self-Directed IRA

Do you have a retirement plan that is still with an employer where you are no longer working? If you have recently lost a job due to COVID-19, or are in job transition, make sure you don’t leave your old 401(k) plan behind. If yours is still with a previous employer, you can rescue those funds and roll them over into a self-directed IRA.

Right now, it’s unclear for many workers if or when there will be a new employer with a new workplace retirement plan. However, one thing is clear: opening an IRA (Roth or Traditional) is an option that enables individuals to make sure their retirement savings stay with them. Moreover, if that new retirement plan is self-directed, there is a much wider range of potential investment options available that account holders—not their employers—control.

Rollovers into self-directed IRAs

Since most 401(k) plans are limited in terms of allowable investments, rescuing and rolling over those funds into a self-directed IRA opens up the door to greater investment opportunity, without the limits imposed by most plan sponsors on the defined contribution plans they offer. As you may know from your existing 401(k), most of those plans are limited to investing in mutual funds or exchange traded funds, stocks, and bonds. Opening a new self-directed IRA will enable you to include an array of alternative assets that you may already know and understand, such as real estate, private equity, precious metals, hedge funds, secured and unsecured notes/loans, energy investments, and more.

Through self-direction, you’ll build a more diverse retirement portfolio, create a hedge against stock market volatility, and gain better control over your investment returns as part of your retirement strategy. You’ll also have the flexibility of buying and selling your investments when you choose, rather than according to a prescribed schedule that most 401(k) plans follow.

You can choose to do a rollover into a new Roth or Traditional IRA, or a SIMPLE or SEP IRA, depending on your employment status, overall tax situation and how far out you are from retirement. As always, we recommend you discuss your unique scenario with a trusted advisor. You may also have to check with the current plan administrator to see if there are any restrictions concerning the type of IRA allowed for a rollover from the existing 401(k).

How to roll funds over into a self-directed IRA

At Next Generation, our comprehensive starter kits walk you through all the steps needed and required documentation to submit in order to open a new self-directed retirement plan with us, and include a rollover form for Traditional, Roth, SEP, or SIMPLE IRAs (we have starter kits for other types of plans as well). Moreover, our helpful team of professionals are available to answer questions about opening a self-directed IRA or about the many types of non-publicly traded, alternative assets, these plans allow. You may schedule a complimentary education session; or you may contact Next Generation by phone at 888.857.8058 or by email at NewAccounts@NextGenerationTrust.com.

Social Investing Through a Self-Directed IRA

Self-directed investors are avoiding the stock market roller coaster by investing in non-publicly traded, alternative assets, through their self-directed IRAs. These retirement plans offer the same tax advantages as regular IRAs, but allow for a broader array of nontraditional investments that traditional brokerage accounts do not. This also enables individuals to build retirement wealth through investments that reflect their personal interest or, in other cases, their ethics. One such class of nontraditional investments is social investing, also called sustainable investing or impact investing.

Examples of social investing are assets that fit into the broader category of environmental, social, and corporate governance (ESG); they foster positive social change, social justice, and protect the environment. Investors are discovering ways to invest in causes that are meaningful to them; these may be renewable energy options that reduce carbon footprint, shares in cooperative farms that lift people out of poverty, or funds that include corporations with excellent employee relations or human rights records.

As with any self-directed investment, social investing means taking the time to research and conduct one’s due diligence. Investors who want to make a difference through their retirement plan can look for ways to support sustainable or impact investing projects, or funds that are managed in a socially responsible way. Maybe you know of a startup that’s bringing clean energy projects to market or clean water to remote villages; or perhaps you want to invest in a minority-led company as a way to diversify your retirement portfolio—and support economic diversity.

Once you’ve done your research and selected sustainable investments to include in your retirement plan, Next Generation—as the self-directed IRA custodian and administrator—will first conduct an administrative review of the asset documents to ensure it meets internal guidelines for self-directed retirement plans. We will then process your transaction based on your instructions, hold the assets, and manage all the paperwork and mandatory filing associated with the investment (mandatory IRS filings of 5498s, or Fair Market Value and 1099s if required).

If you have questions about self-direction as a retirement strategy, or about the many other nontraditional investments these retirement plans allow, you may schedule a complimentary educational session with one of our knowledgeable representatives. You can read more about various types of alternative assets these plans allow here; or contact us directly via email at NewAccounts@NextGenerationTrust.com or call 888.857.8058.

Investing in Private REITs with a Self-Directed IRA

A  real estate investment trust (REIT) is a company that invests in/owns and usually operates all types of income-producing commercial real estate: multi-family housing/apartment buildings, student housing, retirement and senior communities; warehouse and industrial properties; retail centers, hospitality, and office buildings.

In order to qualify as a (REIT), the company must file with the SEC and meet certain SEC requirements. Although most REITs are publicly traded on stock exchanges (known as public, traded or listed REITs), there are also private REITs; like their stock exchange-traded counterparts, private REITS must register with the SEC and are subject to the same IRS regulations. That includes the requirement to return 90 percent of their taxable income to shareholders annually.

One big difference in public vs. private REITs is that the latter are not as susceptible to demand-driven price volatility as public REITs, whose value fluctuates daily; private REITs are valuated annually.

Why invest in a REIT

Renters are on the rise—and so is rental property popularity

Multi-family housing represents a large portion of real estate investments, thanks to an increase in the renter population, which has been in growth mode for a few years and continues to rise. There are several reasons for this:

Investing in private REITs with a self-directed IRA

As you know, a self-directed IRA can include many different types of nontraditional investments, with real estate being the most popular class of alternative assets within these plans.

When your self-directed IRA invests in a private REIT, all income and expenses related to the asset flow in and out of the retirement plan. However, private REITS are not the only type of real estate investment you can include in a self-directed IRA. Other types of real estate investments might allow you to partner your self-directed IRA with another buyer, transact a “fix & flip” and take the profit on the sale of the property, or buy and hold the asset, so the IRA earns tax-advantaged rental income over time.

After you’ve researched a REIT or any other real estate investment you’d like to include in a self-directed retirement plan, it’s time to open and fund your account. At Next Generation we not only provide comprehensive transaction support, we also provide client education about investing in real estate and other alternative assets through a self-directed retirement plan. Of particular importance is understanding prohibited transactions and disqualified persons as defined by the IRS.

If you have questions regarding this strategy, don’t hesitate to contact Next Generation at NewAccounts@NextGenerationTrust.com or call 888.857.8058. Alternatively, you can schedule a complimentary educational session with one of our knowledgeable representatives.

Considering Taking a Hardship Distribution from Your Retirement Plan?

The coronavirus pandemic is leaving millions of Americans on furlough or out of a job, dealing with reduced hours or workload… but NOT with reduced monthly bills to pay. For many, this is a time of financial hardship. Sadly, according to a 2018 Federal Reserve report, 40 percent of adults cannot cover a $400 emergency expense and the current situation goes far beyond that.

Sometimes, individuals consider dipping into one’s retirement plan to cover short-term expenses. Among the emergency expenses that may qualify for such a withdrawal are tuition/education expenses; down payment or repairs on a primary residence, rent or mortgage payments (to thwart possible eviction or foreclosure); out-of-pocket medical expenses; and funeral costs.

Historically:

Changes with the CARES Act

This stimulus package has loosened the rules around taking hardship withdrawals from retirement plans, and loans from 401(k) plans. A CARES Act provision allows individuals who are facing adverse financial consequences due to COVID-19 to withdraw funds from their retirement accounts without penalty (regardless of age). This applies to IRAs and 401(k) plans.

The withdrawal must be made before December 31, 2020 and can be up to $100,000. Tax payments on this income are extended out three years. For those taking loans against their 401(k)s, that amount is also raised to $100,000. Note that there are no loans from IRAs.

Why gamble with your retirement savings?

Many financial experts argue against taking out a hardship loan from one’s 401(k) plan to avoid reducing any retirement savings, when there are other loan options available (such as a home equity loan, SBA loan, or other lines of credit). And, all good intentions aside, it may be difficult to replace the funds from a hardship distribution from an IRA or other retirement plan—and then rebuild on that money for retirement.On top of that, the stock market has suffered a tremendous downturn, with subsequent volatility almost daily, as a result of COVID-19 and the economic stressors stemming from lockdowns.

Weathering market volatility through self-direction

Self-directed investors have greater leeway when it comes to hedging against that stock market volatility. That’s because of the many alternative assets that can be held in a self-directed retirement plan. Investing in real estate, precious metals, private equity, or other non-publicly traded assets give savvy investors many more ways to build a more diverse retirement portfolio that have stronger potential to weather the COVID-19 storm (and other times of economic uncertainty). One reason is because the returns on nontraditional investments in a self-directed IRA do NOT directly correlate with stock market returns.

You can even loan funds from your self-directed IRA to someone who is dealing with a cash flow shortage, with the terms worked out between both parties, and receive interest and principal paid back to your IRA.

As always, it is best to consult your trusted financial adviser about how to navigate financial hardship as it relates to your retirement plan. At Next Generation, we’re here to answer any questions you have about self-direction as a retirement strategy, or about the many alternative assets allowed in these plans. You can schedule a complimentary educational session to learn more or contact us directly via phone at 888.857.8058 or email NewAccounts@NextGenerationTrust.com.

Americans are Working Longer

Recent research from the Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies* shows that Americans are working longer, with 54 percent saying they expect to work past age 65 or never retire at all. Twenty-two percent of respondents said they plan to retire either at age 65 or later, and 22 percent plan to retire earlier.

While there are personal factors around why Americans are working longer – such as maintaining social connections, longer lifespan and emotional health – financial factors are also part of this story. In the U.S., it’s often not having enough saved for retirement and Social Security concerns; three-quarters of the workers surveyed said they are worried that Social Security will not be available when they retire.

Global expectations around retirement age are very interesting to look at and compare with U.S. figures. Transamerica conducted additional research across 15 countries, in collaboration with the Aegon Center for Longevity and Retirement. While the current expected age of retirement in the U.S. is 66 (shared by the United Kingdom and Australia), it is 65 in many European countries and Canada, 60 in India, and 58 in Turkey and China. The findings are based on 14,400 workers and 1,600 retired people surveyed online between 22 January and 14 February 2019.

However, as we know, the average retirement age is rising in the U.S.; for Americans born in 1960 and later, it is 67. The Netherlands is already there and according to the study, France, Spain and Poland are planning to move their retirement age to 67 as well.

Americans are Working Longer, but a Self-Directed IRA Can Help Make the Most of Your Employment and Retirement Timelines

In the Transamerica/Aegon global study, a majority of respondents said they envision an active retirement, where work and leisure can co-exist. Sixty percent cited travel and 57 percent cited spending time with family and friends as important retirement goals; 49 percent said they look forward to pursuing new hobbies. Additionally, 27 percent aspired to do volunteer work and 26 percent planned to include some form of paid work. The two biggest retirement concerns were declining physical health and running out of money.

Whether you retire at age 65 or 66, or continue to work in some capacity well into your retirement years, you can make the most of your retirement savings through self-direction. A self-directed IRA allows you to include many alternative assets, which are not allowed in typical retirement plans, and build a more diverse retirement portfolio. This also allows investors to hedge against the volatility of the stock market, and include nontraditional investments they already know and understand. Why limit yourself to stocks and bonds when you can invest in real estate, precious metals, promissory notes, private equity and joint ventures—and have more control over your returns—within a self-directed IRA?

At Next Generation, we help individuals make the most of their retirement savings and live up to their retirement goals through self-directed retirement plans. If you’re someone who’s comfortable making your own investment decisions and conducting your full due diligence about certain types of investments, you may benefit from self-direction.

Plus, with the SECURE Act provisions that enable workers to continue contributing to a Traditional IRA for a longer timeline, and delay taking required minimum distributions from their plans until age 72, there’s more time to build up one’s retirement nest egg with a broad array of nontraditional investments.

Want to learn more? Sign up for a complimentary educational session about self-directed IRAs with one of our knowledgeable representatives. Alternatively, you can call us directly at 888.857.8058 or email NewAccounts@NextGenerationTrust.com.

*Online survey conducted between October 26 and December 11, 2018 among a nationally representative sample of 5,923 workers who were U.S. residents, age 18 or older; and full-time or part-time workers who are not self-employed and work in a for-profit company employing one or more people.

Including Joint Ventures in a Self-Directed IRA

Did you know that you can use funds in a self-directed IRA to invest in a joint venture? These investments allow you, as a self-directed investor, to enter into a business arrangement with one or more individuals, and create a way for different investors to pool resources for a particular project.

Unlike partnerships, which are between individuals and are long-term arrangements between parties to operate a business, joint ventures are typically for a limited time or for a specific investment. Joint ventures (JVs) are often done in real estate but can be for other investments that the parties intend to sell at a profit within a specified time frame.

According to Investopedia, “Joint ventures, although they are a partnership in the colloquial sense of the word, can take on any legal structure. Corporations, partnerships, limited liability companies, and other business entities can all be used to form a joint venture.”

JVs can be formed for many different types of business activities. Liability is mitigated since the venture is its own entity, separate from the participants’ other business interests. When the JV is a self-directed investment, the IRA, as one of the partners, shares responsibility for the profits, losses and expenses associated with the JV. It is possible for two or more self-directed IRAs to team up on a joint venture.

How joint ventures work with self-directed IRAs

Let’s say you have a self-directed retirement plan and wish to partner with another investor to purchase a piece of real estate. The self-directed IRA makes the investment along with another party or parties as a private placement. Terms of the arrangement are worked out between all involved, including:

Gains on the investment flow back to the self-directed IRA, tax deferred or tax exempt, depending on the type of retirement plan.

Joint ventures carry with them tax and legal considerations. At Next Generation, we recommend that as part of their due diligence, investors consult with their trusted advisors before entering into a joint venture of any kind. It’s also important to educate yourself to avoid a prohibited transaction. As a self-directed retirement plan custodian and administrator, we review all documentation for compliance with IRS guidelines to identify disqualified persons or prohibited transactions.

If you’re considering using your self-directed retirement plan to invest in a joint venture, and have questions about how to get started, contact us via email at NewAccounts@NextGenerationTrust.com or call 888-857-8058. Alternatively, you can schedule a complimentary educational session with one of our representatives to discuss self-direction as a retirement wealth-building strategy.

Promissory Notes and Secured/Unsecured Loans in a Self-Directed IRA

As we wrote about last fall, promissory notes are one way that self-directed investors—individuals with a self-directed IRA or other retirement plan—can provide funding assistance to other parties while building retirement savings. In that article, we focused on real estate notes, also called private mortgage notes; these are promissory notes secured by a piece (or multiple pieces) of real estate.

Self-directed investors can also include promissory notes in their retirement plans. Also known as commercial paper, these are issued by organizations to raise short-term capital for business purposes. Investment notes are essentially loan agreements that guarantee investors that they will receive a return on their investment within a specified time frame.

There are various reasons why a company issues commercial paper—to finance payroll, accounts payable, inventory purchases, or to meet other short-term liabilities. The maturity term is generally from a few weeks to a few months; the loan is based on the borrower’s promise to repay and the lender’s confidence in that ability.

Another type of loan that can be funded through a self-directed IRA is a student loan. The IRA lends money to someone to pay a student loan and the debtor pays back the self-directed IRA with interest.

When promissory notes and other loans come from a self-directed IRA, the repayment terms (such as maturity date, payment schedule, interest paid on the loan, and a default clause) are worked out between the parties involved, instructions are sent to the self-directed IRA administrator, and the repaid funds with interest go directly back into the IRA.

While investing in notes can be a great way to help others get the funding they need in the short term, investors should always be aware of the risks and should fully understand the nontraditional investments they are considering. As with any investment, we strongly recommend that our clients conduct full due diligence in order to protect the tax-advantaged status of their account(s).

When it comes to questions about self-direction as a retirement wealth-building strategy, we’re here to help. We offer many ways to get in touch with us to learn more. One of those ways is to arrange a complimentary educational session with one of our representatives. Alternatively, you can contact us via phone at 888.857.8058 or email NewAccounts@NextGenerationTrust.com.

 

Impact Investing Through a Self-Directed Retirement Plan

Younger investors are changing the investing landscape as they start putting more of their dollars into sustainable investments. This category of investments includes those that consider environmental, social, or government practices.

More and more, millennial investors want to include investments that align with their values within their retirement plans—including their self-directed IRAs.

According to the Morgan Stanley Institute for Sustainable Investing, interest in sustainable investing (SI) has grown among the general population and even more so among millennial investors in recent years.

To name a few ways that social impact investing is showing up in self-directed retirement plans, investors have been including assets such as organic farmland, FINtech, innovative startups, or renewable energy. Popular target investments cited in the Morgan Stanley report were those related to plastic reduction and climate change.

The social impact side of this is important to investors – a majority (83% of the general population and 89% of millennials) said they believed their sustainable investments could create economic growth and reduce poverty. Around one-third of these investors (33% of the general population and 36% of millennials) are also screening investments in order to avoid putting money behind something they object to.

Sustainable investments in a self-directed IRA
Given that self-directed investors have more options in terms of the types of investments their plans can include, it’s no surprise that those interested in supporting environmental and social causes, innovations, and companies are including organic farmland, renewable energy resources, or innovative startups within those plans.

Some other examples of social impact and sustainable investing are:

Self-directed investors make all their own investments decisions – usually based on experience with assets they already know and understand. Self-direction can be a powerful way to put what moves investors most into their retirement plans because it can give investors better control over their earnings. Added benefits of self-direction include portfolio diversification for investors who also wish to continue investing traditionally, and a hedge against stock market volatility.

If you’d like to learn more about the many options available through self-direction as a retirement strategy, register for one of Next Generation’s complimentary educational sessions. Alternatively, you can contact our team directly by phone at 1-888-857-8058 or by email at NewAccounts@NextGenerationTrust.com.

All That Glitters Could be Gold: Investing in Precious Metals in a Self-Directed IRA

Gold, silver and platinum figure big in holiday gift giving. But did you know that not all precious metals are destined to become jewelry? For many investors with self-directed IRAs, precious metals are part of their retirement portfolios.

You may have heard the terms “gold IRA” or “silver IRA.” They refer to the self-directed retirement plans that include these precious metals. In these cases, physical gold, silver or other approved precious metals are held in custody for the benefit of the IRA account owner. Instead of paper assets, there are physical coins or bullion bars, referred to as hard assets.

These alternative assets are easy to own and to manage for savvy investors who already know and understand the precious metals markets. And, precious metals have historically been an excellent way to diversify investment holdings and preserve capital. Gold and silver provide a hedge against inflation and precious metals’ value usually move independently of the stock market, which can make a precious metals IRA a good hedge against market volatility.

Precious metal assets allowed in self-directed IRAs
There are three categories of precious metal assets investors can include in their self-directed retirement plans:

As with other nontraditional investments that are prohibited from self-directed IRAs, rare and collectible coins are NOT acceptable precious metals for this investment purpose.

Setting up a precious metals IRA

Liquidating your assets
You can liquidate precious metals assets any time you wish and your IRA custodian can advise you on the process. Proceeds from the sale of the assets go back into your self-directed IRA as they do with any self-directed asset, so they remain tax-advantaged. You also have the option of taking required minimum distributions in the form of bullion.

Do you have questions about opening a new self-directed IRA or how to execute a transaction concerning a precious metals investment? You may schedule a complimentary educational session or contact our team about self-directed IRAs and the many types of nontraditional investments these plans allow. We’re available via phone at 1-888-857-8058 or by email at NewAccounts@NextGenerationTrust.com.