Further Expansions to “Accredited Investor” Definition

Further Expansions to “Accredited Investor” Definition

Last month, the Securities and Exchange Commission amended its “accredited investor” definition that goes beyond income and net worth criteria; the expanded definition allows investors to qualify based on defined measures of professional knowledge, experience, or certifications. There is also an expanded list of entities that may qualify as an accredited investor, including tribal governments, family offices and certain other organizations.

This status allows individuals to participate in private placements—equity investments such as those allowed in self-directed IRAs. This amendment to the final rule aligns with self-directed investing in another way—using an investor’s knowledge or experience as a basis for participating in investment opportunities. Self-directed investors make their own investment decisions about the alternative assets they wish to include in their retirement plan, based on what they have researched, know, and understand—decisions not based solely on wealth.

The SEC’s previous rule used income or net worth as factors of financial sophistication—individuals had to meet the test of a net worth of at least $1 million excluding the value of primary residence, or income of at least $200,000 each year for the last two years (or $300,000 combined income if married). The amended rule goes beyond wealth as the criterion for purposes of the accredited investor definition.

What the amendments include
The amendments revise Rule 501(a), Rule 215, and Rule 144A of the Securities Act to:

Self-directed IRAs for investors of all kinds
Several years ago, the SEC implemented the JOBS Act in full, which opened up equity crowdfunding platforms to even more individuals, including nonaccredited investors who did not meet the income/net worth tests but wanted to take advantage of equity funding opportunities. For those who want to be angel investors in an early-stage company and/or wish to participate in equity crowdfunding platforms, a self-directed IRA is a valuable vehicle for making these types of investments. The flexibility of these retirement plans and the many non-publicly traded, alternative assets, they allow offer a great way to build a diverse retirement portfolio—and a hedge against stock market volatility with potential to earn greater returns.

At Next Generation, we’re here to help our clients understand the many options available to them as self-directed investors. If you’re wondering what types of investments you can include in a self-directed retirement plan, or have questions about how private equity/private placements can be part of your self-directed portfolio, you can sign up for a complimentary education session to learn more about this retirement wealth-building strategy. You may also contact our team directly with questions, via phone at 888.857.8058 or via email at NewAccounts@NextGenerationTrust.com.

Private Equity Investing Using a Self-Directed IRA

Do you know someone who is starting a company and is seeking investors? Is there an established privately held company you’d like to invest in to help it expand—and earn some equity in the process?

If you have a self-directed IRA, you could include private equity investing for startups and other private companies within your retirement plan. The investment gives you shares that represent ownership or an interest in the entity. Private equity investments are among the many alternative assets in which you can use to build a more diverse retirement portfolio through self-direction.

What is a private equity investment?

Whether via accredited online crowdfunding platforms or direct investment, private equity is a capital investment in an entity that is not publicly traded; rather, it’s an investment in a privately held company. Once only utilized by high-net-worth investors, both accredited and non-accredited investors may now take advantage of this investment opportunity. Including private equity investments in one’s retirement portfolio also provides a hedge against the volatile stock market.

Examples of private equity investments are:

When using a self-directed IRA, the plan invests directly into the business, partnership, or other entity, with terms worked out between the parties (in the case of a private placement, this is typically done via a subscription agreement). The entity gets needed capital and the self-directed investor diversifies his/her retirement portfolio by including this nontraditional investment within the retirement plan.

Ask your financial advisor if a private equity investment is right for you

As with any self-directed investment, account holders should conduct full due diligence about an investment opportunity before sending instructions to the self-directed IRA administrator. At Next Generation, we also strongly recommend that you check with your trusted advisor as to whether private equity and the potential tax liabilities associated with the investment fit with your financial goals. After all, every asset class has its risks – be sure you fully understand the upsides and potential downsides of any self-directed investment before making your decision.

For individuals who would like to invest in private equity, Next Generation offers complimentary educational sessions, so you can learn more about how these investments are structured with a self-directed IRA. Alternatively, you can contact our team with any questions about this or other self-directed investments by phone: 1-888-857-8058 or email: NewAccounts@NextGenerationTrust.com.