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Investing in Distressed Mortgage Notes with a Self-Directed IRA

Investing in Distressed Mortgage Notes with a Self-Directed IRA

We all remember the Great Recession, the housing market crash, and what that wrought for homeowners who could not afford to pay their mortgages. With COVID-19 bringing unemployment and financial hardship to many families, those with mortgages may be struggling to keep up with their payments. These distressed mortgages—also referred to as nonperforming mortgages—can be invested in through a self-directed IRA and create a win-win scenario for both investor and homeowner.

Distressed mortgage notes, like other private lending transactions, are among the alternative assets allowed in a self-directed retirement plan. These nonperforming mortgages are purchased at a discount—typically anywhere from 10 to 50 percent lower than the property’s value—with repayment terms negotiated by the retirement plan owner and the homeowner. This enables the homeowner—who is likely at risk of foreclosure and losing his/her home—to stay in the home and make payments to the self-directed IRA that now holds the note.

Meanwhile, the IRA generates passive income as the full value of the note is repaid, along with the interest agreed upon by both parties. Plus, the investor builds a more diverse retirement portfolio and a hedge against stock market volatility by including private alternate assets in the IRA.

Example of a distressed mortgage note investment:

Due diligence on distressed mortgages

Self-directed investors are accustomed to doing due diligence on their potential investments, and distressed mortgages should be no exception. Like any investment, these notes can carry risks, especially since the buyer (the self-directed IRA) becomes the creditor.

For example, what if the homeowner defaults? The self-directed investor would be wise to research foreclosure laws in that state to ensure they have a backup plan. In addition:

If the investor decides not to work with the homeowners, the self-directed IRA can resell the property or retain it as a rental investment. Again, as with any self-directed investment, it is the responsibility of the account holder to ensure due diligence, full transparency, and a clear understanding of all tax and legal ramifications.

Where to find nonperforming mortgages for investment

Although lenders will typically sell these notes to get them off their books, there are also online marketplaces and trading platforms that sell notes. However, expect to pay more for these notes than buying direct, as these are retail resellers.  You can also invest in a company that buys nonperforming mortgages from banks at steep discounts.

At Next Generation, many of our clients include real estate as well as secured and unsecured loans within their self-directed retirement portfolios. Adding distressed mortgage debt is another valuable way to build retirement savings through alternative assets—with the potential of helping homeowners stay in their homes. If you have questions about this or other alternative assets allowed through self-direction, feel free to schedule a complimentary education session with someone from our team. You can also email NewAccounts@NextGenerationTrust.com or call 888.857.8058.

Promissory Notes and Secured/Unsecured Loans in a Self-Directed IRA

As we wrote about last fall, promissory notes are one way that self-directed investors—individuals with a self-directed IRA or other retirement plan—can provide funding assistance to other parties while building retirement savings. In that article, we focused on real estate notes, also called private mortgage notes; these are promissory notes secured by a piece (or multiple pieces) of real estate.

Self-directed investors can also include promissory notes in their retirement plans. Also known as commercial paper, these are issued by organizations to raise short-term capital for business purposes. Investment notes are essentially loan agreements that guarantee investors that they will receive a return on their investment within a specified time frame.

There are various reasons why a company issues commercial paper—to finance payroll, accounts payable, inventory purchases, or to meet other short-term liabilities. The maturity term is generally from a few weeks to a few months; the loan is based on the borrower’s promise to repay and the lender’s confidence in that ability.

Another type of loan that can be funded through a self-directed IRA is a student loan. The IRA lends money to someone to pay a student loan and the debtor pays back the self-directed IRA with interest.

When promissory notes and other loans come from a self-directed IRA, the repayment terms (such as maturity date, payment schedule, interest paid on the loan, and a default clause) are worked out between the parties involved, instructions are sent to the self-directed IRA administrator, and the repaid funds with interest go directly back into the IRA.

While investing in notes can be a great way to help others get the funding they need in the short term, investors should always be aware of the risks and should fully understand the nontraditional investments they are considering. As with any investment, we strongly recommend that our clients conduct full due diligence in order to protect the tax-advantaged status of their account(s).

When it comes to questions about self-direction as a retirement wealth-building strategy, we’re here to help. We offer many ways to get in touch with us to learn more. One of those ways is to arrange a complimentary educational session with one of our representatives. Alternatively, you can contact us via phone at 888.857.8058 or email NewAccounts@NextGenerationTrust.com.